Jan 22, 2019 Jan 22, 2019
07:30PM 07:30PM Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration: School: Oxford College Department / Organization: Oxford College Building/Room: Old Church - Oxford Cost: Free Contact Name: Lyn Pace, Oxford College Chaplain Contact Phone: 770-784-8392 Contact Email: ppace@emory.edu Join the Oxford community for a celebration of the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. This event takes a look at his written words in “The King Letters: A Retrospective." Three keynote speakers Gregory Ellison, Julian Reid, and Tavares Stephens will collectively discuss King's writing. The event also features performances by Oxappella, the MLK Interdenominational Choir, and Voices of Praise gospel choir as well as readings by Oxford students.  The presidents of Oxford's Student Government Association and Black Student Alliance will welcome attendees and introduce the keynote speakers with Oxford Chaplain Lyn Pace and Dean Douglas Hicks giving the opening and closing remarks. Speaker biosGregory Ellison is a product of Atlanta Public Schools and an alumnus of Frederick Douglass High School. He received a bachelor of arts degree from Emory in 1999, where he was inducted into the Emory College Hall of Fame, the first black male so honored. Ellison continued his educational journey at Princeton Theological Seminary as a Presidential Scholar, receiving a master of divinity degree and a PhD in pastoral theology. Ten years after graduating, he returned to Emory to join the faculty at Candler School of Theology. He is currently an associate professor of pastoral care and counseling. In his second year of teaching at Candler, Ellison was honored as Faculty Person of the Year (2010–2011). Three years later, he received the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, Emory’s most prestigious faculty teaching honor. He is author of Cut Dead But Still Alive: Caring for African American Young Men and Fearless Dialogues: A New Movement for Justice. He is an ordained Baptist minister who has served on the ministerial staffs at both Methodist and Presbyterian churches. Julian Reid creates music out of love for God and neighbor and in order to love God and neighbor. Hailing from Chicago, Reid grew up studying classical and jazz piano at Merit School of Music and also played classical, jazz, and gospel piano around the city. He has served in various music ministries at churches throughout his life including serving as musical director for choirs and praise teams. He has toured as a musician around the world with various acts, including the magician Kenta Koga. As a member of the jazz group the JuJu Exchange, he and his bandmates have recently released their first album, Exchange. Reid is equally interested in theological studies. He completed his undergraduate studies in philosophy at Yale University and is now pursuing a master of divinity degree at Emory's Candler School of Theology. Tavares Stephens is the creator of the spoken-word CD, Lend Me Your Ear, and the author of Soulfood Café, a book of poetry, and Reading Revolution, a biographical overview of people of African descent who’ve made important contributions to civilization. A former member of Poetry Atlanta’s National Poetry Slam Team, he is a former Teacher of the Year and a recipient of Turner Broadcasting’s Teacher Appreciation Award. He holds a master of divinity degree from Emory's Candler School of Theology. This is an Oxford Studies event. + Old Church Campus Events
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07:30PM 08:30PM The Burning: Africa's Migrant and Refugee Crisis: Department / Organization: Aquinas Center Speaker/Presenter: Dr. Isabella Alexander Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://tinyurl.com/y84nbg5u Contact Name: Alice Cameron Contact Email: alice.cameron@emory.edu Link: aquinas.emory.edu The Burning: The Untold Story of Africa's Migrant and Refugee Crisis Speaker: Dr. Isabella Alexander We're in the middle of the largest humanitarian crisis of our time. One in every 112 people in the world is now displaced. Those fleeing conflict and poverty across the African continent make up the largest population of migrants and refugees. THE BURNING will bring their story to life for the first time. ​ Three families. 9,000 miles traveled. One chance to escape. “Hrig,” the Arabic term for “immigration,” translates to “burning.” Many migrants, referred to in North Africa as "burners" or "harragas," burn their identification papers before leaving home, in order to avoid being sent back to their starting points when captured by authorities on their long journeys to Europe. This ritual also symbolizes their decision to burn the past - the only home they have ever known - for the chance of a better future on foreign soil. But what happens when they end up trapped between the the two? Over the past three years, Dr. Isabella Alexander has followed the perilous journeys of three families from their home countries of Mali, Guinea, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo toward the promise of safer shores. She now invites us inside of Africa's migrant and refugee crisis, joining these courageous men, women, and children as they travel thousands of miles along Africa's smuggling routes to the hidden forest camps and detention centers awaiting them just south of Europe's borders in Algeria, Libya, and Morocco. Morocco is less than eight miles from mainland Spain. The two Spanish enclaves that still exist in northern Morocco make it the only African nation to share a land border with Europe. It is the primary crossing point for Africans fleeing political and economic instability across the continent. According to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all citizens of the world are guaranteed the basic right to seek asylum in another country. But over the past decade, the EU has secretly been working against international law to mold Morocco into a permanent holding cell for all African migrations north. Morocco has accepted this agreement in exchange for "development aid." They have banned journalists and aid organizations from the country, as the situation for those trapped there grows more critical. Beaten back at every border and denied their most basic human rights, hundreds of thousands of men, women, and children now find themselves under brutal conditions. The safer shores they risked everything to reach are visible in the distance. + Candler School of Theology, Room 252, 1531 Dickey Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322 Campus Events
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