Feb 20, 2017 Feb 20, 2017
12:00PM 01:30PM The Wilmington Ten (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium Series): University Event Topic: Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Ongoing Event,Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department/Organization: Emory Libraries,German Department,James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference,Rose Library Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Speaker/Presenter: Kenneth Janken (Professor of African American Studies, UNC Chapel Hill) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Anita Spencer Stevens Contact Email: jwji@emory.edu Link: www.jwji.emory.edu In this Race and Difference Colloquium, Kenneth Janken (Professor of African American Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill) will discuss his 2016 book The Wilmington Ten: Violence, Injustice, and the Rise of Black Politics in the 1970s. In February 1971, racial tension surrounding school desegregation in Wilmington, North Carolina, culminated in four days of violence and skirmishes between white vigilantes and black residents.  The turmoil resulted in two deaths, six injuries, more than $500,000 in damage, and the firebombing of a white-owned store, before the National Guard restored uneasy peace.  Despite glaring irregularities in the subsequent trial, ten young persons were convicted of arson and conspiracy and then sentenced to a total of 282 years in prison.  They became known internationally as the Wilmington Ten.  A powerful movement arose within North Carolina and beyond to demand their freedom, and after several witnesses admitted to perjury, a federal appeals court, also citing prosecutorial misconduct, overturned the convictions in 1980.  This presentation narrates the story of the Ten and connects it to a larger arc of Black Power and the transformation of post-Civil Rights era political organizing. This talk is co-sponsored by the Department of German Studies. *Books will be available for purchase during and after the speaker presentation.* + Woodruff Library, Jones Room (RM 311) Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM The Wilmington Ten (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium Series): University Event Topic: Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Ongoing Event,Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department/Organization: Emory Libraries,German Department,James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference,Rose Library Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Speaker/Presenter: Kenneth Janken (Professor of African American Studies, UNC Chapel Hill) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Anita Spencer Stevens Contact Email: jwji@emory.edu Link: www.jwji.emory.edu In this Race and Difference Colloquium, Kenneth Janken (Professor of African American Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill) will discuss his 2016 book The Wilmington Ten: Violence, Injustice, and the Rise of Black Politics in the 1970s. In February 1971, racial tension surrounding school desegregation in Wilmington, North Carolina, culminated in four days of violence and skirmishes between white vigilantes and black residents.  The turmoil resulted in two deaths, six injuries, more than $500,000 in damage, and the firebombing of a white-owned store, before the National Guard restored uneasy peace.  Despite glaring irregularities in the subsequent trial, ten young persons were convicted of arson and conspiracy and then sentenced to a total of 282 years in prison.  They became known internationally as the Wilmington Ten.  A powerful movement arose within North Carolina and beyond to demand their freedom, and after several witnesses admitted to perjury, a federal appeals court, also citing prosecutorial misconduct, overturned the convictions in 1980.  This presentation narrates the story of the Ten and connects it to a larger arc of Black Power and the transformation of post-Civil Rights era political organizing. This talk is co-sponsored by the Department of German Studies. *Books will be available for purchase during and after the speaker presentation.* + Woodruff Library, Jones Room (RM 311) Campus Events
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