Mar 01, 2017 Mar 01, 2017
04:00PM 04:00PM Immersive Virtual Reality as a Research Tool for the Behavioral Sciences: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department/Organization: Center for Mind Brain and Culture Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture Speaker/Presenter: Kerry Marsh (Psychology, University of Connecticut) Cost: FREE Contact Name: Tamara Beck Contact Email: cmbc@emory.edu Link: http://cmbc.emory.edu/events/ Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) has tremendous potential as a research tool for a wide range of behavioral sciences. It has particular utility for studying phenomena that cross scientific boundaries and boundaries between basic and applied sciences. This talk illustrates the use of immersive virtual reality as a tool to study how individuals respond to mundane features of built environments, how they respond to extreme situations (e.g., during emergency evacuation), and how they behave in highly interactive scenarios with other virtual persons (avatars).  Studying perceptual and behavioral responses to environments versus verbal and nonverbal behavior in intensive interpersonal interaction offer different challenges, as this talk will illustrate. Nevertheless, immersive virtual reality allows for rigorous experimental tests of phenomena that are inconvenient to study in the laboratory or are impossible to otherwise study. However, successful use of IVR requires attending to the dynamic, responsive ways we normally interact with our world: preserving the tight coupling between perception and action. The speaker illustrates this with her work examining individual responses to different rooms, as well as her work with engineers and disaster experts studying how groups of individuals evacuate a burning building. In a different arena--studying intensive interpersonal interactions between an individual and virtual persons (avatars)--there are unique benefits of using IVR if the interactions are of a sensitive nature. As the speaker discusses, studying factors that lead up to HIV risk behavior in dating scenarios has poor alternatives in non-IVR methodologies. Having strangers engage in role play creates an awareness of dual-realities that is very awkward and unnatural. Paradoxically, interacting in a virtual scenario with an avatar can theoretically allow individuals to behave more genuinely than in a role-play with a real person.  The speaker will discuss her social/health research using highly interactive dating scenarios in IVR to study precursors to HIV-risk-related behavior. Co-sponsored by the Department of Psychology. + PAIS 290 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details
04:00PM 04:00PM Immersive Virtual Reality as a Research Tool for the Behavioral Sciences: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department/Organization: Center for Mind Brain and Culture Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture Speaker/Presenter: Kerry Marsh (Psychology, University of Connecticut) Cost: FREE Contact Name: Tamara Beck Contact Email: cmbc@emory.edu Link: http://cmbc.emory.edu/events/ Immersive Virtual Reality (IVR) has tremendous potential as a research tool for a wide range of behavioral sciences. It has particular utility for studying phenomena that cross scientific boundaries and boundaries between basic and applied sciences. This talk illustrates the use of immersive virtual reality as a tool to study how individuals respond to mundane features of built environments, how they respond to extreme situations (e.g., during emergency evacuation), and how they behave in highly interactive scenarios with other virtual persons (avatars).  Studying perceptual and behavioral responses to environments versus verbal and nonverbal behavior in intensive interpersonal interaction offer different challenges, as this talk will illustrate. Nevertheless, immersive virtual reality allows for rigorous experimental tests of phenomena that are inconvenient to study in the laboratory or are impossible to otherwise study. However, successful use of IVR requires attending to the dynamic, responsive ways we normally interact with our world: preserving the tight coupling between perception and action. The speaker illustrates this with her work examining individual responses to different rooms, as well as her work with engineers and disaster experts studying how groups of individuals evacuate a burning building. In a different arena--studying intensive interpersonal interactions between an individual and virtual persons (avatars)--there are unique benefits of using IVR if the interactions are of a sensitive nature. As the speaker discusses, studying factors that lead up to HIV risk behavior in dating scenarios has poor alternatives in non-IVR methodologies. Having strangers engage in role play creates an awareness of dual-realities that is very awkward and unnatural. Paradoxically, interacting in a virtual scenario with an avatar can theoretically allow individuals to behave more genuinely than in a role-play with a real person.  The speaker will discuss her social/health research using highly interactive dating scenarios in IVR to study precursors to HIV-risk-related behavior. Co-sponsored by the Department of Psychology. + PAIS 290 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details