Feb 11, 2019 Feb 11, 2019
12:00PM 01:30PM The Art of the Slave Ship Icon: University Event Topic: Academics,Campus Life & Student Orgs,Community,Diversity,Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Cheryl Finley, Associate Professor of Art History, Cornell University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) This talk explores how an eighteenth-century engraving of a slave ship became a cultural icon of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was--shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film—and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. + Ethics Center Commons, RM 102 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details
12:00PM 01:30PM The Art of the Slave Ship Icon: University Event Topic: Academics,Campus Life & Student Orgs,Community,Diversity,Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Cheryl Finley, Associate Professor of Art History, Cornell University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) This talk explores how an eighteenth-century engraving of a slave ship became a cultural icon of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. One of the most iconic images of slavery is a schematic wood engraving depicting the human cargo hold of a slave ship. First published by British abolitionists in 1788, it exposed this widespread commercial practice for what it really was--shocking, immoral, barbaric, unimaginable. Printed as handbills and broadsides, the image Cheryl Finley has termed the "slave ship icon" was easily reproduced, and by the end of the eighteenth century it was circulating by the tens of thousands around the Atlantic rim. Committed to Memory provides the first in-depth look at how this artifact of the fight against slavery became an enduring symbol of black resistance, identity, and remembrance. Finley traces how the slave ship icon became a powerful tool in the hands of British and American abolitionists, and how its radical potential was rediscovered in the twentieth century by black artists, activists, writers, filmmakers, and curators. Finley offers provocative new insights into the works of Amiri Baraka, Romare Bearden, Betye Saar, and many others. She demonstrates how the icon was transformed into poetry, literature, visual art, sculpture, performance, and film—and became a medium through which diasporic Africans have reasserted their common identity and memorialized their ancestors. + Ethics Center Commons, RM 102 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details
04:15PM 05:45PM Lecture by Dr. Lauren Klein: University Event Topic: Academics,College,Humanities,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: English Department,Quantitative Theory and Methods (Institute for) Building/Room: Callaway Memorial Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: English Department Speaker/Presenter: Dr. Lauren Klein Event Open To: All Students,Faculty Cost: Free Contact Name: Meredith Blankinship Contact Email: mblanki@emory.edu Lauren Klein is an associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, where she also directs the Digital Humanities Lab. She received her A.B. from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). Her research interests include digital humanities, data visualization, data studies, food studies, and early American literature. In 2017, she was named one of the “rising stars in digital humanities” by Inside Higher Ed. Her first book, Matters of Taste: Eating, Aesthetics, and the Early American Archive, is forthcoming from the University of Minnesota Press. It shows how thinking about eating can help to tell new stories about the range of people, from the nation’s first presidents to their enslaved chefs, who worked to establish a cultural foundation for the United States. With Matthew K. Gold, she edits Debates in the Digital Humanities (University of Minnesota Press), a hybrid print/digital publication stream that explores debates in the field as they emerge. The next book in this series is Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019. + Callaway N301 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details
04:15PM 05:45PM Lecture by Dr. Lauren Klein: University Event Topic: Academics,College,Humanities,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: English Department,Quantitative Theory and Methods (Institute for) Building/Room: Callaway Memorial Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: English Department Speaker/Presenter: Dr. Lauren Klein Event Open To: All Students,Faculty Cost: Free Contact Name: Meredith Blankinship Contact Email: mblanki@emory.edu Lauren Klein is an associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, where she also directs the Digital Humanities Lab. She received her A.B. from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY). Her research interests include digital humanities, data visualization, data studies, food studies, and early American literature. In 2017, she was named one of the “rising stars in digital humanities” by Inside Higher Ed. Her first book, Matters of Taste: Eating, Aesthetics, and the Early American Archive, is forthcoming from the University of Minnesota Press. It shows how thinking about eating can help to tell new stories about the range of people, from the nation’s first presidents to their enslaved chefs, who worked to establish a cultural foundation for the United States. With Matthew K. Gold, she edits Debates in the Digital Humanities (University of Minnesota Press), a hybrid print/digital publication stream that explores debates in the field as they emerge. The next book in this series is Debates in the Digital Humanities 2019. + Callaway N301 Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details