Feb 18, 2019 Feb 18, 2019
12:00AM 12:00AM Framing Shadows: Portraits of Nannies from the Robert Langmuir African American Photograph Collection: University Event Topic: Academics,Arts,Community,Diversity,Humanities,Ongoing Event,Politics,Public Health,Religion & Ethics,Research,Theology Type of Art: historical photographs Department / Organization: Emory Libraries,Rose Library,Schatten Gallery,Woodruff Library Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Venue: Schatten Gallery Contact Name: Kathryn Dixson Contact Email: kathryn.v.dixson@emory.edu Woodruff Library - Wayfinding Location: Schatten Gallery Link: https://web.library.emory.edu/news-events/news/archives/2019/framing-shadows-nannies-exhibit.html This exhibition features historical photographs of African American nannies and encourages visitors to look beyond stereotypes and consider the lives of the women, girls, and sometimes men who spent years raising the children of white families. Kimberly Wallace-Sanders, author and associate professor of African American Studies at Emory, selected about 20 photos from the Robert Langmuir African American Photograph Collection at the Rose Library, an extensive collection of over 12,000 photographs depicting African American life from 1840–1970. Her goal is to humanize these mostly anonymous nannies and inspire visitors with relatives who served as nannies to come forward with their stories. + Schatten Gallery (rotunda and corridor), Woodruff Library Level 3 Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:00PM WGSS Academic Community Building Brown Bag series: School: Oxford College Department / Organization: Oxford College Speaker/Presenter: Keynote: Kadji Amin Cost: Free Contact Name: Alix Olson Contact Email: alix.olson@emory.edu The Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Academic Community Building Brown Bag series kicks off Monday, Feb. 18. Please RSVP by the end of the day Thursday, Feb. 14, if you plan to lunch with us by contacting Alix Olson. You're welcome to join us without RSVP'ing but we will have enough food to accommodate those who have reserved space. Our first speaker Kadji Amin is an assistant professor and graduate director of WGSS at Emory University. Amin was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in “Sex” at the University of Pennsylvania Humanities Forum (2015-16) and a Faculty Fellow at the Humanities Institute at Stony Brook (2015). He earned his Ph.D. in romance studies (French) with a graduate certificate in feminist studies from Duke University in 2009. His book, Disturbing Attachments: Genet, Pederasty, and Queer History was published in September 2017 with the Theory Q Series at Duke University Press. The book de-idealizes Jean Genet’s coalitional politics with the Black Panthers and the Palestinians by foregrounding their animation by unsavory and outdated modes of attachment, including pederasty, racial fetishism, nostalgia for prison, and fantasies of queer terrorism. His second book project uses the history of transsexual science to rethink the priorities of transgender and feminist theory.  Questions? Please contact Alix Olson. + Phi Gamma Hall Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Convicted & Condemned: Politics, Prisoner Reentry: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Keesha Middlemass, Associate Professor of Political Science, Howard University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html Through the compelling words of former prisoners, this book talk by Professor Middlemass examines the lifelong consequences of a felony conviction. Felony convictions restrict social interactions and hinder felons’ efforts to reintegrate into society. The educational and vocational training offered in many prisons are typically not recognized by accredited educational institutions as acceptable course work or by employers as valid work experience, making it difficult for recently-released prisoners to find jobs. Families often will not or cannot allow their formerly incarcerated relatives to live with them. In many states, those with felony convictions cannot receive financial aid for further education, vote in elections, receive welfare benefits, or live in public housing. In short, they are not treated as full citizens, and every year, hundreds of thousands of people released from prison are forced to live on the margins of society. Convicted and Condemned explores the issue of prisoner reentry from the felons’ perspective. It features the voices of formerly incarcerated felons as they attempt to reconnect with family, learn how to acclimate to society, try to secure housing, find a job, and complete a host of other important goals. By examining national housing, education and employment policies implemented at the state and local levels, Keesha Middlemass shows how the law challenges and undermines prisoner reentry and creates second-class citizens. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Convicted & Condemned: Politics, Prisoner Reentry: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Keesha Middlemass, Associate Professor of Political Science, Howard University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html Through the compelling words of former prisoners, this book talk by Professor Middlemass examines the lifelong consequences of a felony conviction. Felony convictions restrict social interactions and hinder felons’ efforts to reintegrate into society. The educational and vocational training offered in many prisons are typically not recognized by accredited educational institutions as acceptable course work or by employers as valid work experience, making it difficult for recently-released prisoners to find jobs. Families often will not or cannot allow their formerly incarcerated relatives to live with them. In many states, those with felony convictions cannot receive financial aid for further education, vote in elections, receive welfare benefits, or live in public housing. In short, they are not treated as full citizens, and every year, hundreds of thousands of people released from prison are forced to live on the margins of society. Convicted and Condemned explores the issue of prisoner reentry from the felons’ perspective. It features the voices of formerly incarcerated felons as they attempt to reconnect with family, learn how to acclimate to society, try to secure housing, find a job, and complete a host of other important goals. By examining national housing, education and employment policies implemented at the state and local levels, Keesha Middlemass shows how the law challenges and undermines prisoner reentry and creates second-class citizens. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Michael Krische, UT Austin: University Event Topic: Science School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Department of Chemistry Seminar Program Speaker/Presenter: Michael Krische Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu “Hydrogen-Mediated C-C Bond Formation” Stereo- and site-selective methods for the byproduct-free modification of unprotected organic compounds that occur through the addition or redistribution of hydrogen are natural endpoints in the advancement of methods for efficient, green chemical synthesis. Progress toward this goal requires a departure from reactants that embody non-native structural elements, including stoichiometric organometallic reagents, directing/protecting groups and chiral auxiliaries. Professor Michael J. Krische (B.S. UC Berkeley; PhD Stanford University) has developed a broad, new family of C-C bond formations that merge the characteristics of catalytic hydrogenation and carbonyl addition. Hydrogenation or transfer hydrogenation of π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of C=X (X = O, NR) bonds delivers products of carbonyl or imine addition. In related hydrogen auto-transfer reactions, alcohols served dually as reductants and carbonyl proelectrophiles, enabling direct conversion of lower alcohols to higher alcohols. Such hydrogen-mediated C-C bond formations define a departure from the use of stoichiometric organometallic reagents, and the issues of safety, selectivity, and waste associated with their use. Reviews & Perspectives: (a) Ketcham, J. M.; Shin, I.; Montgomery, T. P.; Krische, M. J. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 9142. (b) Feng, J.; Kasun, Z. A.; Krische, M. J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 5467. (c) Nguyen, K. D.; Park, B. Y.; Luong, T.; Sato, H.; Garza, V. J.; Krische, M. J. Science 2016, 354, 300. (d) Kim, S. W.; Zhang, W.; Krische, M. J. Acc. Chem. Res. 2017, 50, 2371. Hosted by Simon Blakey. + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Michael Krische, UT Austin: University Event Topic: Science School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Department of Chemistry Seminar Program Speaker/Presenter: Michael Krische Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu “Hydrogen-Mediated C-C Bond Formation” Stereo- and site-selective methods for the byproduct-free modification of unprotected organic compounds that occur through the addition or redistribution of hydrogen are natural endpoints in the advancement of methods for efficient, green chemical synthesis. Progress toward this goal requires a departure from reactants that embody non-native structural elements, including stoichiometric organometallic reagents, directing/protecting groups and chiral auxiliaries. Professor Michael J. Krische (B.S. UC Berkeley; PhD Stanford University) has developed a broad, new family of C-C bond formations that merge the characteristics of catalytic hydrogenation and carbonyl addition. Hydrogenation or transfer hydrogenation of π-unsaturated reactants in the presence of C=X (X = O, NR) bonds delivers products of carbonyl or imine addition. In related hydrogen auto-transfer reactions, alcohols served dually as reductants and carbonyl proelectrophiles, enabling direct conversion of lower alcohols to higher alcohols. Such hydrogen-mediated C-C bond formations define a departure from the use of stoichiometric organometallic reagents, and the issues of safety, selectivity, and waste associated with their use. Reviews & Perspectives: (a) Ketcham, J. M.; Shin, I.; Montgomery, T. P.; Krische, M. J. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 9142. (b) Feng, J.; Kasun, Z. A.; Krische, M. J. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 5467. (c) Nguyen, K. D.; Park, B. Y.; Luong, T.; Sato, H.; Garza, V. J.; Krische, M. J. Science 2016, 354, 300. (d) Kim, S. W.; Zhang, W.; Krische, M. J. Acc. Chem. Res. 2017, 50, 2371. Hosted by Simon Blakey. + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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