Feb 25, 2019 Feb 25, 2019
12:00PM 01:30PM Slave & Free Black Marriage in the 19th Century: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Tera Hunter, Professor of History and African-American Studies, Princeton University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Americans have long viewed marriage between a white man and a white woman as a sacred union. But marriages between African Americans have seldom been treated with the same reverence. This discriminatory legacy traces back to centuries of slavery, when the overwhelming majority of black married couples were bound in servitude as well as wedlock. Though their unions were not legally recognized, slaves commonly married, fully aware that their marital bonds would be sustained or nullified according to the whims of white masters. Bound in Wedlock is the first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century. Uncovering the experiences of African American spouses in plantation records, legal and court documents, and pension files, Tera W. Hunter reveals the myriad ways couples adopted, adapted, revised, and rejected white Christian ideas of marriage. Setting their own standards for conjugal relationships, enslaved husbands and wives were creative and, of necessity, practical in starting and supporting families under conditions of uncertainty and cruelty. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Slave & Free Black Marriage in the 19th Century: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Tera Hunter, Professor of History and African-American Studies, Princeton University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Americans have long viewed marriage between a white man and a white woman as a sacred union. But marriages between African Americans have seldom been treated with the same reverence. This discriminatory legacy traces back to centuries of slavery, when the overwhelming majority of black married couples were bound in servitude as well as wedlock. Though their unions were not legally recognized, slaves commonly married, fully aware that their marital bonds would be sustained or nullified according to the whims of white masters. Bound in Wedlock is the first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century. Uncovering the experiences of African American spouses in plantation records, legal and court documents, and pension files, Tera W. Hunter reveals the myriad ways couples adopted, adapted, revised, and rejected white Christian ideas of marriage. Setting their own standards for conjugal relationships, enslaved husbands and wives were creative and, of necessity, practical in starting and supporting families under conditions of uncertainty and cruelty. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Tessa R. Calhoun, UT Knoxville: University Event Topic: Science,Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Speaker/Presenter: Tessa R. Calhoun Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu "Illuminating the interaction between small molecules and cell membranes" The membranes of infectious fungi and bacteria have emerged as attractive antimicrobial targets due to the relatively rare occurrences of resistance for those drugs active against them. There exists, however, an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action for many such membrane-associated small molecule drugs. Using multiple nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy techniques we are directly probing native small molecule drugs as they interact with the membranes of living bacterial and fungal cells. Specifically, using second harmonic generation spectroscopy we have monitored the interaction of multiple small molecules, including the drug, daptomycin, with living S. aureus and E. faecalis cells. These results have revealed both flip-flop and clustering behavior with subtle changes in structure greatly impacting these dynamics. Further, transient absorption microscopy has allowed for the first ever visualization of the unmodified antifungal drug, amphotericin B, with living S. cerevisiae cells. Our images suggest behavior of this drug that is not consistent with any previously proposed mechanism of action. Overall our works promises new insights into the complex factors governing these important biological systems. Hosted by Brian Dyer. + Atwood Hall 360, Department of Chemistry Seminar Room Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Tessa R. Calhoun, UT Knoxville: University Event Topic: Science,Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Speaker/Presenter: Tessa R. Calhoun Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu "Illuminating the interaction between small molecules and cell membranes" The membranes of infectious fungi and bacteria have emerged as attractive antimicrobial targets due to the relatively rare occurrences of resistance for those drugs active against them. There exists, however, an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms of action for many such membrane-associated small molecule drugs. Using multiple nonlinear microscopy and spectroscopy techniques we are directly probing native small molecule drugs as they interact with the membranes of living bacterial and fungal cells. Specifically, using second harmonic generation spectroscopy we have monitored the interaction of multiple small molecules, including the drug, daptomycin, with living S. aureus and E. faecalis cells. These results have revealed both flip-flop and clustering behavior with subtle changes in structure greatly impacting these dynamics. Further, transient absorption microscopy has allowed for the first ever visualization of the unmodified antifungal drug, amphotericin B, with living S. cerevisiae cells. Our images suggest behavior of this drug that is not consistent with any previously proposed mechanism of action. Overall our works promises new insights into the complex factors governing these important biological systems. Hosted by Brian Dyer. + Atwood Hall 360, Department of Chemistry Seminar Room Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:00PM Psychology Colloquium Speaker: Katalin Gothard: University Event Topic: Health,Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: Psychology Department Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Jocelyne Bachevalier, Ph.D. Speaker/Presenter: Katalin Gothard, Ph.D. Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free “Multi-dimensional Neural Selectivity in the Primate Amygdala” Many brain structures are known for carrying out more than one function. Among these the amygdala is particularly versatile as it has been implicated in cognitive processes that range from sensory-perceptual, to decision-making, and coordinates the elaboration emotional behaviors accompanied by autonomic responses. While no single functional definition can capture the role of the amygdala in the mammalian brain, the diversity of functions linked to the amygdala is likely reflected in the response properties of its component neurons. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which single neurons in the macaque amygdala can exhibit multiple types of stimulus-selectivity and/or task-related responses in the context of the same task. The task required decision making based on learned stimulus-reward associations where the choices were two simultaneously playing videos with social or non-social content. We found that neurons in the amygdala were tuned to two or more of the following: (1) alerting stimuli pertaining to the task (fixation, stimulus onset and offset), (2) stimulus categories (social vs. non-social), (3) stimulus –unique features (faces, eyes), and (4) reward magnitude. A disproportionate number of neurons were modulated by all of the stimulus features and task events examined. These findings suggest that neurons in the macaque amygdala show multi-dimensional selectivity. Specialized subpopulations uniquely tuned to certain types of stimuli (e.g., faces) may, therefore, respond to other types of stimuli, or to behavioral events, if these stimuli become behaviorally relevant in the context of a complex task. + PAIS Building Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:00PM Psychology Colloquium Speaker: Katalin Gothard: University Event Topic: Health,Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: Psychology Department Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Jocelyne Bachevalier, Ph.D. Speaker/Presenter: Katalin Gothard, Ph.D. Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free “Multi-dimensional Neural Selectivity in the Primate Amygdala” Many brain structures are known for carrying out more than one function. Among these the amygdala is particularly versatile as it has been implicated in cognitive processes that range from sensory-perceptual, to decision-making, and coordinates the elaboration emotional behaviors accompanied by autonomic responses. While no single functional definition can capture the role of the amygdala in the mammalian brain, the diversity of functions linked to the amygdala is likely reflected in the response properties of its component neurons. The goal of this study was to determine the extent to which single neurons in the macaque amygdala can exhibit multiple types of stimulus-selectivity and/or task-related responses in the context of the same task. The task required decision making based on learned stimulus-reward associations where the choices were two simultaneously playing videos with social or non-social content. We found that neurons in the amygdala were tuned to two or more of the following: (1) alerting stimuli pertaining to the task (fixation, stimulus onset and offset), (2) stimulus categories (social vs. non-social), (3) stimulus –unique features (faces, eyes), and (4) reward magnitude. A disproportionate number of neurons were modulated by all of the stimulus features and task events examined. These findings suggest that neurons in the macaque amygdala show multi-dimensional selectivity. Specialized subpopulations uniquely tuned to certain types of stimuli (e.g., faces) may, therefore, respond to other types of stimuli, or to behavioral events, if these stimuli become behaviorally relevant in the context of a complex task. + PAIS Building Campus Events
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