Feb 04, 2019 Feb 04, 2019
12:00PM 01:30PM OutKast & the Rise of the Hip Hop South: University Event Topic: Academics,Campus Life & Student Orgs,College,Community,Diversity,Entertainment School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Regina Bradley, Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies, Kennesaw State University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Dr. Bradley's current book-length project, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip Hop South (under contract, UNC Press), explores how Atlanta, GA hip hop duo OutKast influences conversations about the Black American South after the Civil Rights Movement. Chronicling Stankonia stems from her critically acclaimed series OutKasted Conversations, a YouTube dialogue series about the impact of OutKast on popular culture. Dr. Bradley’s work on popular culture and race is published in south: an interdisciplinary journal, Meridians, Comedy Studies, ADA, Journal of Ethnic American Literature, Palimpsest, and Current Musicology. Dr. Bradley's public scholarship is featured on a range of news media outlets including Washington Post, NPR, NewsOne, SoundingOut!, and Creative Loafing Atlanta. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM OutKast & the Rise of the Hip Hop South: University Event Topic: Academics,Campus Life & Student Orgs,College,Community,Diversity,Entertainment School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Regina Bradley, Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies, Kennesaw State University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Dr. Bradley's current book-length project, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip Hop South (under contract, UNC Press), explores how Atlanta, GA hip hop duo OutKast influences conversations about the Black American South after the Civil Rights Movement. Chronicling Stankonia stems from her critically acclaimed series OutKasted Conversations, a YouTube dialogue series about the impact of OutKast on popular culture. Dr. Bradley’s work on popular culture and race is published in south: an interdisciplinary journal, Meridians, Comedy Studies, ADA, Journal of Ethnic American Literature, Palimpsest, and Current Musicology. Dr. Bradley's public scholarship is featured on a range of news media outlets including Washington Post, NPR, NewsOne, SoundingOut!, and Creative Loafing Atlanta. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:00PM Episodic Memory Decline Across the Adult Lifespan: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: Psychology Department Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Charlie Ferris Speaker/Presenter: Audrey Duarte, Ph.D. Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free One of the most common and arguably most distressing cognitive declines in aging, in large part because it is also an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, is in episodic memory. As people age, they report more everyday difficulties in, for example, remembering someone’s name or the location of a placed item. Cognitive aging research over the past several decades has revealed many important insights into the factors contributing to these impairments and it is clear that there is no single cause of decline or path to memory improvement. We employ a multimodal approach to tackle this multifaceted problem in my laboratory, using objective and subjective measures of behavior, fMRI, EEG, neuropsychology, univariate and multivariate analyses to understand the neurocognitive functions that are responsible for the increasing prevalence of episodic memory failures across the adult lifespan. Our results have revealed a number of important insights that may help differentiate what is normal age-related memory decline from what is indicative of neurodegenerative disease. I will present data from my lab suggesting that age-related dysfunction in prefrontal-mediated cognitive control is a major contributor to older adults’ episodic memory impairments, when they are observed. We have also shown that young and older adults’ patterns of encoding and retrieval brain activity and memory performance are more alike than different and, in some conditions, older adults perform as well or better than young adults. I will present results showing inter-individual variability in both neural activity and memory performance across age and discuss the demographic, lifestyle, and mood factors that likely contribute to this variability across the lifespan. Our planned and future work will directly assess the impact of such factors on memory ability and the interventions that might facilitate memory ability and stave off cognitive decline. + PAIS Building, Room 290 Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:00PM Episodic Memory Decline Across the Adult Lifespan: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: Psychology Department Building/Room: Psychology Building Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Charlie Ferris Speaker/Presenter: Audrey Duarte, Ph.D. Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free One of the most common and arguably most distressing cognitive declines in aging, in large part because it is also an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, is in episodic memory. As people age, they report more everyday difficulties in, for example, remembering someone’s name or the location of a placed item. Cognitive aging research over the past several decades has revealed many important insights into the factors contributing to these impairments and it is clear that there is no single cause of decline or path to memory improvement. We employ a multimodal approach to tackle this multifaceted problem in my laboratory, using objective and subjective measures of behavior, fMRI, EEG, neuropsychology, univariate and multivariate analyses to understand the neurocognitive functions that are responsible for the increasing prevalence of episodic memory failures across the adult lifespan. Our results have revealed a number of important insights that may help differentiate what is normal age-related memory decline from what is indicative of neurodegenerative disease. I will present data from my lab suggesting that age-related dysfunction in prefrontal-mediated cognitive control is a major contributor to older adults’ episodic memory impairments, when they are observed. We have also shown that young and older adults’ patterns of encoding and retrieval brain activity and memory performance are more alike than different and, in some conditions, older adults perform as well or better than young adults. I will present results showing inter-individual variability in both neural activity and memory performance across age and discuss the demographic, lifestyle, and mood factors that likely contribute to this variability across the lifespan. Our planned and future work will directly assess the impact of such factors on memory ability and the interventions that might facilitate memory ability and stave off cognitive decline. + PAIS Building, Room 290 Campus Events
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