Mar 25, 2019 Mar 25, 2019
01:00PM 02:30PM Presumed Criminal: Black Youth in Postwar New York: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Carl Suddler, Assistant Professor of History, Florida Atlantic University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Disproportionate black youth encounters with the expansive justice system remain one of our nation’s most enduring crises. And, even as black youths in the twenty-first century articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many continue to be surprised by the disparities between black and white youth experiences in the justice system. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler points to a critical shift in the carceral turn between the 1930s and 1960s when state responses to juvenile delinquency increasingly criminalized black youths and tethered their lives to a justice system that became less rehabilitative and more punitive. In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the long postwar period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Excessive police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. So, even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details
01:00PM 02:30PM Presumed Criminal: Black Youth in Postwar New York: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Carl Suddler, Assistant Professor of History, Florida Atlantic University Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Disproportionate black youth encounters with the expansive justice system remain one of our nation’s most enduring crises. And, even as black youths in the twenty-first century articulate their own experiences with carceral authorities, many continue to be surprised by the disparities between black and white youth experiences in the justice system. In Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in Postwar New York (NYU Press, 2019), Carl Suddler points to a critical shift in the carceral turn between the 1930s and 1960s when state responses to juvenile delinquency increasingly criminalized black youths and tethered their lives to a justice system that became less rehabilitative and more punitive. In New York City, increased state surveillance of predominantly black communities compounded arrest rates during the long postwar period, providing justification for tough-on-crime policies. Excessive police practices, like stop-and-frisk, combined with media sensationalism, cemented the belief that black youth were the primary cause for concern. So, even before the War on Crime, the stakes were clear: race would continue to be the crucial determinant in American notions of crime and delinquency, and black youths condemned with a stigma of criminality would continue to confront the overwhelming power of the state. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
RSVP Sync to Goggle Event Details