Mar 04, 2019 Mar 04, 2019
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12:00PM 01:30PM Race, Gender & Media Depictions of Michelle Obama: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Ray Block Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Michelle Obama is one of the most prominent women in contemporary U.S. politics. Her status as (the now former) First Lady has encouraged many voters, particularly those of color, to become more involved in civic life. Her public initiatives have contributed to a reduction in child obesity and healthier school lunches. Her White House garden made healthy eating a national issue. She is an effective campaigner for other Democrats and a talented public speaker. Yet the narrative the media presents often focuses on other issues than her political influence or the success of her initiatives. Because of her professional background, fashion choices, and political style, Michelle Obama departs from many traditions about who a First Lady is and how a First Lady behaves. All of these factors would be expected to shape media coverage of her tenure in the White House and beyond. However, race touches much that is said and published about her. Media generators seem to feel that because of her race they can write about Michelle Obama in ways that no First Lady has ever been covered. The scrutiny of Michelle Obama has gone far beyond what is typical. For the past decade, Dr. Block has been participating in a joint research project with Christina Haynes on the media’s coverage of Michelle Obama. In this talk, he will discuss why they became Michelle Obama scholars and what this line of research teaches us about the broader study of Black women in politics. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Race, Gender & Media Depictions of Michelle Obama: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: Emory College Department / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Building/Room: Robert W. Woodruff Library Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race Speaker/Presenter: Ray Block Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Registration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162 Contact Name: Latrice Carter Contact Email: latrice.carter@emory.edu Link: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html (JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium) Michelle Obama is one of the most prominent women in contemporary U.S. politics. Her status as (the now former) First Lady has encouraged many voters, particularly those of color, to become more involved in civic life. Her public initiatives have contributed to a reduction in child obesity and healthier school lunches. Her White House garden made healthy eating a national issue. She is an effective campaigner for other Democrats and a talented public speaker. Yet the narrative the media presents often focuses on other issues than her political influence or the success of her initiatives. Because of her professional background, fashion choices, and political style, Michelle Obama departs from many traditions about who a First Lady is and how a First Lady behaves. All of these factors would be expected to shape media coverage of her tenure in the White House and beyond. However, race touches much that is said and published about her. Media generators seem to feel that because of her race they can write about Michelle Obama in ways that no First Lady has ever been covered. The scrutiny of Michelle Obama has gone far beyond what is typical. For the past decade, Dr. Block has been participating in a joint research project with Christina Haynes on the media’s coverage of Michelle Obama. In this talk, he will discuss why they became Michelle Obama scholars and what this line of research teaches us about the broader study of Black women in politics. + Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library Campus Events
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