Mar 06, 2019 Mar 06, 2019
12:00PM 01:30PM Lecture by Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt: University Event Topic: Academics,College,Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: English Department,Quantitative Theory and Methods (Institute for) Building/Room: Callaway Memorial Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: English Department Speaker/Presenter: Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt Event Open To: All Students,Faculty Cost: Free Contact Name: Meredith Blankinship Contact Email: mblanki@emory.edu Mark Algee-Hewitt’s research focuses on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in England and Germany and seeks to combine literary criticism with digital and quantitative analyses of literary texts. In particular he is interested in the history of aesthetic theory and the development and transmission of aesthetic and philosophic concepts during the Enlightenment and Romantic periods. He is also interested in the relationship between aesthetic theory and the poetry of the long eighteenth century. Although his primary background is in English literature, he also has a degree in computer science. As the director of the Stanford Literary Lab, he is working to bring his interests in quantitative analysis, digital humanities and eighteenth-century literature to bear on a number of new collaborative projects. His current book project, The Afterlife of the Sublime, explores the history of the sublime by tracing its discursive patterns through over 11,000 texts from the long eighteenth century, seeking clues to the disappearance of the term at the end of the Romantic period. As a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at McGill University, working with the Interacting with Print Research group, Dr. Algee-Hewitt was also involved in a variety of projects that combine literary interpretation with quantitative analysis. + Callaway N301 Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Lecture by Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt: University Event Topic: Academics,College,Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Research School: Emory College Department / Organization: English Department,Quantitative Theory and Methods (Institute for) Building/Room: Callaway Memorial Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: English Department Speaker/Presenter: Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt Event Open To: All Students,Faculty Cost: Free Contact Name: Meredith Blankinship Contact Email: mblanki@emory.edu Mark Algee-Hewitt’s research focuses on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in England and Germany and seeks to combine literary criticism with digital and quantitative analyses of literary texts. In particular he is interested in the history of aesthetic theory and the development and transmission of aesthetic and philosophic concepts during the Enlightenment and Romantic periods. He is also interested in the relationship between aesthetic theory and the poetry of the long eighteenth century. Although his primary background is in English literature, he also has a degree in computer science. As the director of the Stanford Literary Lab, he is working to bring his interests in quantitative analysis, digital humanities and eighteenth-century literature to bear on a number of new collaborative projects. His current book project, The Afterlife of the Sublime, explores the history of the sublime by tracing its discursive patterns through over 11,000 texts from the long eighteenth century, seeking clues to the disappearance of the term at the end of the Romantic period. As a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at McGill University, working with the Interacting with Print Research group, Dr. Algee-Hewitt was also involved in a variety of projects that combine literary interpretation with quantitative analysis. + Callaway N301 Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Judy Wu, University of Houston: University Event Topic: Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Francesco Evangelista Speaker/Presenter: Judy Wu Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu When Counting Electrons Matter: Tuning Noncovalent Interactions with Aromaticity Abstract: Aromaticity and hydrogen bonding are traditionally considered to be largely separate ideas in chemistry. We find however, that just as a change in aromaticity can enhance chemical reactivity (e.g., consider the effect of an aromatic transition state on a cycloaddition reaction)—a change in aromaticity can perturb the strengths of hydrogen bonding interactions (and even more exotic types of noncovalent interactions). Hydrogen-bonding interactions that polarize π-electrons to increase cyclic [4n+2] π-electron delocalizations (i.e., enhance aromaticity) in heterocycles are stronger than expected, while those that decrease cyclic [4n+2] π-electron delocalization (i.e., reduce aromaticity) are weakened. Following Baird’s Rule for excited-state aromaticity (a reverse of the Hückel rule), hydrogen bonding interactions at specific ππ* excited states display the opposite trend. Anion-π interactions—even without a π-acidic ring—can be especially favorable when they achieve 3D “six-interstitial electron” aromaticity. I will talk about the interpretive merit, predictive power, and probable impacts of these special connections for applications in organic and supramolecular chemistry (e.g., in enzyme catalysis, self-assembly, host-guest recognition). + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Judy Wu, University of Houston: University Event Topic: Seminars & Workshops School: Emory College Department / Organization: Chemistry Department Building/Room: Atwood Chemistry Center Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Francesco Evangelista Speaker/Presenter: Judy Wu Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Kira Walsh Contact Email: kwalsh6@emory.edu When Counting Electrons Matter: Tuning Noncovalent Interactions with Aromaticity Abstract: Aromaticity and hydrogen bonding are traditionally considered to be largely separate ideas in chemistry. We find however, that just as a change in aromaticity can enhance chemical reactivity (e.g., consider the effect of an aromatic transition state on a cycloaddition reaction)—a change in aromaticity can perturb the strengths of hydrogen bonding interactions (and even more exotic types of noncovalent interactions). Hydrogen-bonding interactions that polarize π-electrons to increase cyclic [4n+2] π-electron delocalizations (i.e., enhance aromaticity) in heterocycles are stronger than expected, while those that decrease cyclic [4n+2] π-electron delocalization (i.e., reduce aromaticity) are weakened. Following Baird’s Rule for excited-state aromaticity (a reverse of the Hückel rule), hydrogen bonding interactions at specific ππ* excited states display the opposite trend. Anion-π interactions—even without a π-acidic ring—can be especially favorable when they achieve 3D “six-interstitial electron” aromaticity. I will talk about the interpretive merit, predictive power, and probable impacts of these special connections for applications in organic and supramolecular chemistry (e.g., in enzyme catalysis, self-assembly, host-guest recognition). + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:30PM CMBC Lecture Series | Fiery Cushman: University Event Topic: Lectures & Meetings School: All Emory University Department / Organization: Center for Mind Brain and Culture Building/Room: White Hall Meeting Organizer/Sponsor: Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture Speaker/Presenter: Fiery Cushman Event Open To: All (Public) Cost: Free Contact Name: Leslie Grant Contact Email: leslie.s.grant@emory.edu Link: http://cmbc.emory.edu/events/lectures/index.html HOW WE KNOW WHAT NOT TO THINK | A striking feature of the real world is that there is too much to think about. This feature is remarkably understudied in laboratory contexts, where the study of decision-making is typically limited to small “choice sets” defined by an experimenter. In such cases an individual may devote considerable attention to each item in the choice set. But in everyday life we are often not presented with defined choice sets; rather, we must construct a viable set of alternatives to consider. I will present several recent and ongoing research projects that each aim to understand how humans spontaneously decide what actions to consider—in other words, how we construct choice sets. A common theme among these studies is a key role for cached value representations. Additionally, I will present some evidence that moral norms play a surprisingly and uniquely large role in constraining choice sets and, more broadly, in modal cognition. This suggests a new avenue for understanding the specific manner in which morality influences human behavior + None Campus Events
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07:30PM 09:30PM Southern Circuit Film Series: School: Oxford College Department / Organization: Oxford College Building/Room: Williams Hall (Oxford) Cost: Free Contact Name: Danielle Dockery Contact Email: danielle.dockery@emory.edu Hale County This Morning, This Evening will be the March selection when Oxford hosts the 2018-19 Southern Circuit tour of independent films. An initiative of the Atlanta-based arts organization South Arts, Southern Circuit brings the best of independent film to communities across the South. Audiences have seen over 300 films and have engaged filmmakers in post-screening discussions in more than 100 communities across the Southern United States. The tour connects audiences with independent filmmakers. Composed of intimate and unencumbered moments of people in a community in Alabama’s Black Belt, Hale County This Morning, This Evening offers an emotive impression of the historic South. Daniel Collins attends college in search of opportunity while Quincy Bryant becomes a father to an energetic son. Creating a poetic form that privileges the patiently observed interstices of their lives, RaMell Ross’ film trumpets the beauty of life and consequences of race, while simultaneously existing as a testament to dreaming – despite the odds. About the filmmaker: RaMell Ross (Director/Producer, Writer, Cinematographer, Sound Recordist, Editor) earned a BA in both English and Sociology from Georgetown University and an MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. His photographs have been exhibited internationally and his writing has appeared in such outlets as the New York Times and Walker Arts Center. He was part of Filmmaker Magazine’s “25 New Faces of Independent Film” in 2015, and a New Frontier Artist in Residence at the MIT Media Lab. In 2016, he was a finalist for the Aperture Portfolio Prize, winner of an Aaron Siskind Individual Photographer’s Fellowship Grant and a Sundance Art of Nonfiction Fellow. In early 2017, he was selected for Rhode Island Foundation’s Robert and Margaret MacColl Johnson Artist Fellowship. Ross is currently on faculty at Brown University’s Visual Arts Department. Hale County This Morning, This Evening is his first feature documentary.  This is an Oxford Studies event. + Oxford College Campus Events
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