Jan 30, 2020 Jan 30, 2020
08:00AM 12:00PM 2020 TI:GER Innovation Conference: 2020 TI:GER® Innovation Conference The Future of the Legal Industry: How Innovation Can Enhance Access to Justice This year’s theme is the Future of the Legal Industry.  We are motivated to act by the rapid changes occurring in the legal industry and the need for a public debate about the impact of these changes on the delivery of legal services and education. Speakers Include: Dan Rodriguez, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law        Cat Moon, Vanderbilt University School of Law Keith Robinson, SMU Diego Alcala, Legal Tech Founder Charlotte Alexander, Georgia State Law  Alyson Carrel, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law David Colarusso, Suffolk University Law School Anusia Gillespie, Eversheds-Sutherland Gayle Gorvett, General Counsel & Strategic Advisor David Gross, Faegre Baker Daniels Melonie Jones, Assurant Maya Markovich, (Dentons) NextLaw Labs Mike Whelan, LegalTech Consultant & Strategist Deloris Wilson, Social Impact Strategist Tarun Wadhwa, Entrepreneur Program Agenda: 8:30 a.m. – Welcome Remarks 8:45 a.m. - Opening Remarks “The Future of the Legal Industry” by Dan Rodriguez 9:15 a.m. – Legal Educators Panel: What Should Law Schools be Doing Now? 10:00 a.m. – Legal Services Providers Panel: How Can Innovation Enhance Access to Justice? 11:00 a.m. – Networking Break 11:30 a.m. – Emerging Roles for Lawyers in Technology 12:15 p.m. – Closing Remarks – How Will Legal Tech Shape the Future of Legal Practice + Tull Auditorium Campus Events
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11:00AM 01:30PM Aquinas Day: Aquinas Day Schedule:Service at Cannon Chapel - 11:00-12:00pmLuncheon Lecture - 12:00-1:30pmRegistration is for the Luncheon LectureSpeaker: Dr. Andrew Prevot, Associate Professor of Theology at Boston CollegeTitle:"Who Do You Say That I Am?" (Mark 8:29): Questions of Identity in Theology and PoliticsDescription:St. Thomas Aquinas famously teaches that God's existence and essence are identical. This means that the way God exists perfectly corresponds to who and what God is. Creatures are not like this. Our existence is a struggle in which we must endeavor to find ourselves, become ourselves, and be true to ourselves. This struggle is made much harder by the fact that everything with which we seek to establish our identities comes to us through a violent world. Race, gender, sexuality, language, religion, family, community, profession, even personality are born of a tangled web of historical relations that may wound and alienate us even as we seek to find ourselves in them. Theology offers some hope by inviting us to ask who we are in God's merciful eyes. Jesus's question for his disciples, "Who do you say that I am?" is one that we might prayerfully address back to him with reference to ourselves. This would be a question not merely of fact but of calling. It would be an effort to understand who we are meant to become amid the chaos of this fallen world. Speaker Biography: Andrew Prevot is associate professor of theology at Boston College who writes and teaches at the intersection of spiritual, mystical, systematic, and liberation theologies; phenomenology; and continental philosophies of religion. Recent publications include, Thinking Prayer: Theology and Spirituality Amid the Crises of Modernity (University of Notre Dame Press, 2015) and “Ignacio Ellacuría and Enrique Dussel: On the Contributions of Phenomenology to Liberation Theology” which appeared in A Grammar of Justice: The Legacy of Ignacio Ellacuría, edited by. J. Matthew Ashley and Kevin Burke (Orbis, 2014). Prevot has a new book entitled Theology and Race: Black and Womanist Traditions in the United States (Brill, 2018) expected July 2018. He earned his B.A. from Colorado College and his Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame. + Cannon Chapel and CST 360<br>1531 Dickey Drive<br>Atlanta, GA 30322 Campus Events
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