Feb 03, 2020 Feb 03, 2020
12:00PM 01:00PM Why Leave, Why Come?: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceBuilding/Room: Robert W. Woodruff LibraryMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceSpeaker/Presenter: Dr. Rashida Braggs - Williams CollegeEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162Contact Name: Rhonda PatrickContact Email: rhonda.patrick@emory.eduLink: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html(JWJI Spring Colloquium Series) "Why Leave, Why Come? The Push-Pull of the U.S. for Black Jazz Musicians In 1919 the New Orleans born saxophonist and clarinetist Sidney Bechet first traveled abroad to England. He was one of the first musicians to introduce jazz abroad. In fact, the first ever jazz review was written in response to his memorable performances in London as part of Will Marion Cook’s Southern Syncopated Orchestra. Bechet’s wanderlust did not fade over time; he would migrate domestically and internationally many times before settling in France in 1950 until his death there in 1959. In 1983, Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo first set off for France to study jazz. She contributed to the birth of the world music scene in France, and in her mélange of genres later sought out the Americas. In a trilogy album series, she retraced the corners of the triangular slave trade. However, her musical trajectory did not lead her back to France, nor home to Benin. Instead she made Brooklyn, New York her home base over 20 years ago. Exploring their migratory experiences, Rashida K. Braggs investigates the push and pull of the U.S. for black jazz musicians. Braggs’ interdisciplinary methodology of historiography, ethnography and solo-embodied performance will shape a presentation that shares music, dance, interviews and more. + Robert W. Woodruff Library - Jones Room Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:00PM Why Leave, Why Come?: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceBuilding/Room: Robert W. Woodruff LibraryMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceSpeaker/Presenter: Dr. Rashida Braggs - Williams CollegeEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162Contact Name: Rhonda PatrickContact Email: rhonda.patrick@emory.eduLink: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html(JWJI Spring Colloquium Series) "Why Leave, Why Come? The Push-Pull of the U.S. for Black Jazz Musicians In 1919 the New Orleans born saxophonist and clarinetist Sidney Bechet first traveled abroad to England. He was one of the first musicians to introduce jazz abroad. In fact, the first ever jazz review was written in response to his memorable performances in London as part of Will Marion Cook’s Southern Syncopated Orchestra. Bechet’s wanderlust did not fade over time; he would migrate domestically and internationally many times before settling in France in 1950 until his death there in 1959. In 1983, Beninese singer Angelique Kidjo first set off for France to study jazz. She contributed to the birth of the world music scene in France, and in her mélange of genres later sought out the Americas. In a trilogy album series, she retraced the corners of the triangular slave trade. However, her musical trajectory did not lead her back to France, nor home to Benin. Instead she made Brooklyn, New York her home base over 20 years ago. Exploring their migratory experiences, Rashida K. Braggs investigates the push and pull of the U.S. for black jazz musicians. Braggs’ interdisciplinary methodology of historiography, ethnography and solo-embodied performance will shape a presentation that shares music, dance, interviews and more. + Robert W. Woodruff Library - Jones Room Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Gregory Hudalla, University of Florida: Room: Atwood Hall 360University Event Topic: Research,Science,Seminars & WorkshopsDepartment / Organization: Chemistry DepartmentSchool: Emory CollegeHost: Vince ConticelloEvent Contact: kwalsh6@emory.eduCommunity: biomolecular,faculty,graduate,postdocsLink: https://www.bme.ufl.edu/labs/hudalla/"Advancing Biomaterials and Biotherapeutics through Molecular Assembly" Bio: Dr. Hudalla received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 2004, a M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 2006, and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 2010. Dr. Hudalla was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University from 2010-2013 through support from an NIH National Research Service Award. Dr. Hudalla is currently an Associate Professor and a University Term Professor in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been since 2013. Dr. Hudalla’s research program develops biotherapeutics and biomaterials with new or improved functional properties via molecular engineering and self-assembly. Dr. Hudalla has authored more than 25 papers, is co-editor of the book “Mimicking the Extracellular Matrix: The Intersection of Matrix Biology and Biomaterials”, and holds 2 US patents, with another 10 currently pending. Dr. Hudalla has received the Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Young Innovator award, the Journal of Materials Chemistry B Emerging Investigator award, a National Science Foundation RAISE award, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Trailblazer award, the National Science Foundation Career award, the University of Wisconsin Alumni Early Career Achievement award, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award. Abstract: The coordinated assembly of biomolecules throughout the natural world provides a fascinating blueprint to design new materials for biomedicine and biotechnology.  Our research program employs simple molecular assembly motifs, namely coiled-coil peptide scaffolds and beta-sheet peptide nanofibers, to organize proteins and carbohydrates into precise supramolecular architectures.  In one application, we develop recombinant fusion “assembly tags” to install enzymes into peptide nanofibers that entangle into injectable hydrogels. In a second application, we develop a strategy to create nanofibers with tailored composition of carbohydrates as the basis for synthetic mimics of extracellular matrix glycoproteins. The utility of this technology is illustrated by creating nanofibers that can modulate the activity of galectins, a family of carbohydrate-binding extracellular signaling proteins, as well as mimic the barrier function of mucins.  More recently, we’ve shown that tailoring glycosylation of peptide nanofibers can encode hierarchical order by stabilizing weak carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. In a third application, we are developing strategies to anchor biotherapeutics, such as anti-inflammatory enzymes, to specific tissue locations by engineering them to bind to abundant cell surface and extracellular matrix carbohydrates. Finally, we are creating a cell signaling rheostat by employing coiled-coil scaffolds to kinetically trap protein ligands in assemblies with precisely defined numbers of signaling subunits. Together, these approaches demonstrate the enormous potential of molecular assembly to advance the capabilities of biomaterials and biotherapeutics finding increasing use in medical and biotechnology applications. + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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03:30PM 04:30PM Seminar: Gregory Hudalla, University of Florida: Room: Atwood Hall 360University Event Topic: Research,Science,Seminars & WorkshopsDepartment / Organization: Chemistry DepartmentSchool: Emory CollegeHost: Vince ConticelloEvent Contact: kwalsh6@emory.eduCommunity: biomolecular,faculty,graduate,postdocsLink: https://www.bme.ufl.edu/labs/hudalla/"Advancing Biomaterials and Biotherapeutics through Molecular Assembly" Bio: Dr. Hudalla received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 2004, a M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 2006, and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin in 2010. Dr. Hudalla was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University from 2010-2013 through support from an NIH National Research Service Award. Dr. Hudalla is currently an Associate Professor and a University Term Professor in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, where he has been since 2013. Dr. Hudalla’s research program develops biotherapeutics and biomaterials with new or improved functional properties via molecular engineering and self-assembly. Dr. Hudalla has authored more than 25 papers, is co-editor of the book “Mimicking the Extracellular Matrix: The Intersection of Matrix Biology and Biomaterials”, and holds 2 US patents, with another 10 currently pending. Dr. Hudalla has received the Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering Young Innovator award, the Journal of Materials Chemistry B Emerging Investigator award, a National Science Foundation RAISE award, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering Trailblazer award, the National Science Foundation Career award, the University of Wisconsin Alumni Early Career Achievement award, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award. Abstract: The coordinated assembly of biomolecules throughout the natural world provides a fascinating blueprint to design new materials for biomedicine and biotechnology.  Our research program employs simple molecular assembly motifs, namely coiled-coil peptide scaffolds and beta-sheet peptide nanofibers, to organize proteins and carbohydrates into precise supramolecular architectures.  In one application, we develop recombinant fusion “assembly tags” to install enzymes into peptide nanofibers that entangle into injectable hydrogels. In a second application, we develop a strategy to create nanofibers with tailored composition of carbohydrates as the basis for synthetic mimics of extracellular matrix glycoproteins. The utility of this technology is illustrated by creating nanofibers that can modulate the activity of galectins, a family of carbohydrate-binding extracellular signaling proteins, as well as mimic the barrier function of mucins.  More recently, we’ve shown that tailoring glycosylation of peptide nanofibers can encode hierarchical order by stabilizing weak carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. In a third application, we are developing strategies to anchor biotherapeutics, such as anti-inflammatory enzymes, to specific tissue locations by engineering them to bind to abundant cell surface and extracellular matrix carbohydrates. Finally, we are creating a cell signaling rheostat by employing coiled-coil scaffolds to kinetically trap protein ligands in assemblies with precisely defined numbers of signaling subunits. Together, these approaches demonstrate the enormous potential of molecular assembly to advance the capabilities of biomaterials and biotherapeutics finding increasing use in medical and biotechnology applications. + Atwood Hall 360 Campus Events
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