Feb 04, 2020 Feb 04, 2020
04:00PM 05:00PM CMBC Lecture | John Hale: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: All Emory University,Emory College,School of MedicineDepartment / Organization: Center for Mind Brain and CultureBuilding/Room: Psychology BuildingMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: Center for Mind, Brain, and CultureSpeaker/Presenter: John HaleEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeContact Name: Leslie GrantContact Email: leslie.s.grant@emory.eduLink: http://cmbc.emory.edu/events/lectures/index.htmlLECTURE: Modeling Neural Time Series with Linguistic Structure Reception to follow in PAIS Lobby ABSTRACT: It's hard to say what the physical basis of human language comprehension is. It has something to do with the brain, but what exactly? What is it that our brains do such that a stream of words comes together to yield a communicative or literary experience? This scientific challenge cuts right across mind, brain and culture. Modeling neural signals offers a particular angle from which to approach this challenge. With functional neuroimaging, it is possible to extract a timecourse of brain activity from particular regions and ask how well alternative (psycho)linguistic theories account for the measured signal. This approach can be carried out over prolonged periods, for instance during the spoken recitation of a literary text. It offers the opportunity to observed quite detailed facets of linguistic information processing that are repeated many times in a naturalistic stimulus. The talk considers four specific predictors that are motivated by longstanding theoretical ideas in cognitive science. Formalizing these predictors and scaling them up using techniques from computational linguistics, we ask about the functional anatomy of language processing within the brain. If there is time, I will also take up two bonus predictors that turn out to be useful in explaining human EEG signals. The results cohere well with prior experimental findings and exemplify a quite general method for inferring processing mechanisms during ecologically natural episodes of cognition. + PAIS 230 Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:00PM CMBC Lecture | John Hale: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: All Emory University,Emory College,School of MedicineDepartment / Organization: Center for Mind Brain and CultureBuilding/Room: Psychology BuildingMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: Center for Mind, Brain, and CultureSpeaker/Presenter: John HaleEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeContact Name: Leslie GrantContact Email: leslie.s.grant@emory.eduLink: http://cmbc.emory.edu/events/lectures/index.htmlLECTURE: Modeling Neural Time Series with Linguistic Structure Reception to follow in PAIS Lobby ABSTRACT: It's hard to say what the physical basis of human language comprehension is. It has something to do with the brain, but what exactly? What is it that our brains do such that a stream of words comes together to yield a communicative or literary experience? This scientific challenge cuts right across mind, brain and culture. Modeling neural signals offers a particular angle from which to approach this challenge. With functional neuroimaging, it is possible to extract a timecourse of brain activity from particular regions and ask how well alternative (psycho)linguistic theories account for the measured signal. This approach can be carried out over prolonged periods, for instance during the spoken recitation of a literary text. It offers the opportunity to observed quite detailed facets of linguistic information processing that are repeated many times in a naturalistic stimulus. The talk considers four specific predictors that are motivated by longstanding theoretical ideas in cognitive science. Formalizing these predictors and scaling them up using techniques from computational linguistics, we ask about the functional anatomy of language processing within the brain. If there is time, I will also take up two bonus predictors that turn out to be useful in explaining human EEG signals. The results cohere well with prior experimental findings and exemplify a quite general method for inferring processing mechanisms during ecologically natural episodes of cognition. + PAIS 230 Campus Events
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07:30PM 09:00PM The Story of Christian Art as Iconography: Department / Organization: Aquinas CenterCost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://aquinas.emory.edu/calendar.html?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D132789416Link: https://aquinas.emory.edu/calendar.html?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D132789416Speaker: Fr. Panayiotis PapageorgiouSpeaker Biography: Fr. Panayiotis Papageorgiou, Ph.D., ProtopresbyterFr. Panayiotis was born in Cyprus. After his military service he left for the U.S. where he studied Chemical Engineering in New York City at the City College. He received his Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering cum laude. He then continued his studies on a Graduate Research Scholarship at the University of Notre Dame where he completed his Master’s Degree in Chemical Engineering.He joined Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology in Boston in August 1984 in order to pursue theological studies, from where he graduated three years later with the degree Master of Divinity with High Distinction. Following that, he enrolled in the Early Christian Studies Program of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. He was awarded the Ph.D. degree in February of 1995 with a specialization in the history and theology of the Early Christian Church. Fr. Panayiotis was ordained a deacon in 1988 and a presbyter (priest) a month later. Fr. Panayiotis is a member of the International Association for Patristic Studies, the Orthodox Theological Society of America and the North American Patristic Society. Fr. Panayiotis serves as President of the Clergy Syndesmos of the Metropolis of Atlanta since July 2008 and has been on the Archdiocesan Presbyters Council since July 2010 and the Archdiocesan Council since July 2012. He is currently serving at Holy Transfiguration Greek Orthodox Church in Marietta, Georgia + Candler School of Theology, Room 252<br>1531 Dickey Drive<br>Atlanta, GA 30322 Campus Events
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