Mar 02, 2020 Mar 02, 2020
12:00PM 01:00PM Some Love For Us: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceBuilding/Room: Robert W. Woodruff LibraryMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceSpeaker/Presenter: Dr. Deborah McDowell - University of VirginiaEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162Contact Name: Rhonda PatrickContact Email: rhonda.patrick@emory.eduLink: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html(JWJI Spring Colloquium Series)"Some Love for Us:  Representing Emotion in the Art and Politics of # Black Lives Matter”According to Alicia Garza, who is credited with being one of the founders of #Black Lives Matter, the Facebook post that purportedly launched the movement was conceived as a “love letter to black people.” Recounting her reaction to the announcement that the jury had acquitted George Zimmerman of all charges in the murder of Trayvon Martin, Garza writes, “It actually felt like I got punched in the gut.  So I went on social media to try to find words for what was happening and what I wanted in that moment was some love for us, and so I wrote a love letter to Black people . . . and I said, “Black people, I love you.  I love us.  We matter.  Our Lives Matter.  Black Lives Matter.”  Stimulated by Garza’s statement, this lecture explores the following questions:  How have black people “answered” Garza’s love letter? Should the “love letter” be imagined as addressing black people the world over, encouraging them to see themselves as bodies that “matter” amid anti-black racism?  Inasmuch as Black Lives Matter is simultaneously an aesthetic and political movement, we are particularly interested in the answers to this question at the level of aesthetics, not least because Black Lives Matter is a movement both aesthetic and political in origins and aims. + Robert W. Woodruff Library - Jones Room Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:00PM Some Love For Us: University Event Topic: Lectures & MeetingsSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceBuilding/Room: Robert W. Woodruff LibraryMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and DifferenceSpeaker/Presenter: Dr. Deborah McDowell - University of VirginiaEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://form.jotform.com/53145385695162Contact Name: Rhonda PatrickContact Email: rhonda.patrick@emory.eduLink: http://jamesweldonjohnson.emory.edu/home/colloquium/index.html(JWJI Spring Colloquium Series)"Some Love for Us:  Representing Emotion in the Art and Politics of # Black Lives Matter”According to Alicia Garza, who is credited with being one of the founders of #Black Lives Matter, the Facebook post that purportedly launched the movement was conceived as a “love letter to black people.” Recounting her reaction to the announcement that the jury had acquitted George Zimmerman of all charges in the murder of Trayvon Martin, Garza writes, “It actually felt like I got punched in the gut.  So I went on social media to try to find words for what was happening and what I wanted in that moment was some love for us, and so I wrote a love letter to Black people . . . and I said, “Black people, I love you.  I love us.  We matter.  Our Lives Matter.  Black Lives Matter.”  Stimulated by Garza’s statement, this lecture explores the following questions:  How have black people “answered” Garza’s love letter? Should the “love letter” be imagined as addressing black people the world over, encouraging them to see themselves as bodies that “matter” amid anti-black racism?  Inasmuch as Black Lives Matter is simultaneously an aesthetic and political movement, we are particularly interested in the answers to this question at the level of aesthetics, not least because Black Lives Matter is a movement both aesthetic and political in origins and aims. + Robert W. Woodruff Library - Jones Room Campus Events
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01:00PM 02:15PM David Malinowski, San Jose State University: University Event Topic: College,Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Special EventSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: Halle Institute for Global Research, Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives,Program in LinguisticsMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: Program in Linguistics, Halle Institute/CFDE Global Atlanta Innovative Teaching Grant, Emory College Language CenterCost: FreeContact Name: Darni BoldenContact Email: dbolde2@emory.edu"Identities, Histories, and Bodies in Place: Exploring the Linguistic Landscape in Three Dimensions" - This talk will review three dominant paradigms of research in the field of linguistic landscape (the study of multilingualism in public spaces), while drawing lessons from each for language teachers and learners. The first paradigm, embodied in works such as Backhaus’ (2006) monolithic study of 12,000 signs in Tokyo, Japan, presents a synchronic view of competing cultural and political interests as they are visible in variables such as code choice, orthographic conventions, and the assumed pragmatic functions of signs. The second paradigm takes up the more recent qualitative turn in Linguistic Landscape Studies, whereby researchers utilize ethnographic and other qualitative methods in order to ‘look behind the signs’ into histories, cultures, and people’s lived experience in place (e.g., Lou 2016). In turn, the third paradigm raises questions about the diverse and sometimes invisible ways in which people make sense of themselves and each other, as seen through lenses such as affect and embodiment, virtuality and mobility, protest and social transformation, and imagination and memory. I argue that, while these approaches are often presented in the literature as mutually incompatible due to their different assumptions and methods, for the purposes of language teaching, they can profitably be used together to develop learners’ multidimensional repertoires of strategies for perceiving, understanding, and transforming real-world discourses in place. + Convocation Hall, Room 204 (limited seating - lunch/lecture requires RSVP see contact below). Campus Events
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01:00PM 02:15PM David Malinowski, San Jose State University: University Event Topic: College,Humanities,Lectures & Meetings,Special EventSchool: Emory CollegeDepartment / Organization: Halle Institute for Global Research, Office of Global Strategy and Initiatives,Program in LinguisticsMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: Program in Linguistics, Halle Institute/CFDE Global Atlanta Innovative Teaching Grant, Emory College Language CenterCost: FreeContact Name: Darni BoldenContact Email: dbolde2@emory.edu"Identities, Histories, and Bodies in Place: Exploring the Linguistic Landscape in Three Dimensions" - This talk will review three dominant paradigms of research in the field of linguistic landscape (the study of multilingualism in public spaces), while drawing lessons from each for language teachers and learners. The first paradigm, embodied in works such as Backhaus’ (2006) monolithic study of 12,000 signs in Tokyo, Japan, presents a synchronic view of competing cultural and political interests as they are visible in variables such as code choice, orthographic conventions, and the assumed pragmatic functions of signs. The second paradigm takes up the more recent qualitative turn in Linguistic Landscape Studies, whereby researchers utilize ethnographic and other qualitative methods in order to ‘look behind the signs’ into histories, cultures, and people’s lived experience in place (e.g., Lou 2016). In turn, the third paradigm raises questions about the diverse and sometimes invisible ways in which people make sense of themselves and each other, as seen through lenses such as affect and embodiment, virtuality and mobility, protest and social transformation, and imagination and memory. I argue that, while these approaches are often presented in the literature as mutually incompatible due to their different assumptions and methods, for the purposes of language teaching, they can profitably be used together to develop learners’ multidimensional repertoires of strategies for perceiving, understanding, and transforming real-world discourses in place. + Convocation Hall, Room 204 (limited seating - lunch/lecture requires RSVP see contact below). Campus Events
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07:00PM 08:30PM Guest Lecture - Sarah Murray: Department / Organization: Middle Eastern and South Asian StudiesMeeting Organizer/Sponsor: Emory Program in Mediterranean Archaeology; Emory Program in Ancient Mediterranean Studies; Georgia State University Center for Hellenic StudiesSpeaker/Presenter: Sarah MurrayEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeLink: http://mesas.emory.edu/home/Dr. Sarah Murray, Assistant Professor, Department of Classics, University of Toronto “Connectivities, Collapses, and Coastal Landscapes: New Insights into Attica’s History from the Bay of Porto Raphti” This paper presents the findings of the inaugural season of the Bays of East Attica Regional Survey project (BEARS). Operating in Greece under the auspices of the Canadian Institute in Greece and with the oversight of the East Attica Ephorate of Archaeology, the project aims to clarify the history of human activity around the bay of Porto Raphti in eastern Attica. The work especially concentrated on developing a clearer understanding of the chronology and nature of finds in three areas around the bay with known surface assemblages: the Pounta peninsula, Raphtis island, and the valley and acropolis of the Koroni peninsula. The Pounta peninsula yielded an extraordinary quantity of obsidian lithics and evidence of industrial activity that suggest the site served as an important nexus of exchange between Attica and the Cyclades in the Early Bronze Age. Surface finds from the Raphtis island demonstrate that this was the location of a major refuge settlement during periods of state collapse at the end of the Late Bronze Age (12th century BCE) and in the Late Roman period (6th-7th century CE). At Koroni, a high quantity of imported amphoras and fine wares constitutes robust evidence that the population of the area was integrated into the southern Aegean economy in the Hellenistic period. Overall, these survey data provide a remarkable range of new evidence and insight into the history of the Porto Raphti area and its connections to other regions of the Aegean, as well as the responses of coastal dwellers to periods of social upheaval and uncertainty. Methodologically, the project’s work also demonstrates the value of conducting extensive and intensive survey even in areas with extensive modern development. + Carlos Museum, Ackerman Hall Campus Events
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