Jan 28, 2021 Jan 28, 2021
12:00PM 01:30PM Aquinas Day: School: School of TheologyDepartment / Organization: Aquinas CenterEvent Open To: All (Public),All Students,Alumni,By Invitation Only,Donors,Emory College Students,Emory Community,Executive MBA,Faculty,Full-time MBA,Graduate Students,Juniors,Organization Members,Oxford College Students,Parents,PhD Students Advanced to Candidacy,Private Event,Prospective Students,Recruiters,School of Business Students,School of Medicine Students,School of Nursing Students,School of Public Health Students,School of Theology Students,Sophomores,Staff,Undergraduate BBA,YerkesCost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://bit.ly/AquinasDay2021Contact Name: Alice CameronContact Email: alice.cameron@emory.eduLink: https://bit.ly/AquinasDay2021Title: Elevating Flesh: Womanist Ethics, Afro-Caribbean Carnival, and Divine EnjoymentSpeaker: Nicole SymmondsWebinar Description: There are various religious experiences if religion is defined as a cultural set of beliefs and practices that people gather around. If part of this is the gathering of persons inspired to give focused attention, adoration, and commitment to a subject or object, Trinidad Carnival and its attending practices fit into the category of religious experience. In popular Christian consciousness, Carnival exists on the fringes of what would be considered religious practice because of the festival's seeming erotic charge. Such an understanding threatens to overshadow the essence of what Carnival is, a religious, cultural experience where people of the African-Caribbean diaspora ritually participate in a practice of liberation. Carnival shares the dynamism of Black Catholic religiosity, particularly regarding its ability to enflesh freedom incarnationally, making a way out of no way for African-Caribbean people to embody their spirituality and make sense of their corporeal reality in an unjust world.This lecture explores how Trinidad Carnival serves as a practice of liberation among Black women in the 21st century who craft practices that challenge the intersecting oppressions of race, class, gender, and sexuality. These practices of liberation clarify the significance of the corporeal body of the Black woman, the unifying effect of music, the healing impact of ecstatic dance, and the connection to God that divine enjoyment of this nature enables.Speaker Biography: Nicole Symmonds is a doctoral candidate in the Graduate Division of Religion in the Ethics & Society course of study. Her work focuses on Christian social ethics and women, gender and sexuality. + Webinar Event Campus Events
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12:00PM 01:30PM Aquinas Day: School: School of TheologyDepartment / Organization: Aquinas CenterEvent Open To: All (Public),All Students,Alumni,By Invitation Only,Donors,Emory College Students,Emory Community,Executive MBA,Faculty,Full-time MBA,Graduate Students,Juniors,Organization Members,Oxford College Students,Parents,PhD Students Advanced to Candidacy,Private Event,Prospective Students,Recruiters,School of Business Students,School of Medicine Students,School of Nursing Students,School of Public Health Students,School of Theology Students,Sophomores,Staff,Undergraduate BBA,YerkesCost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://bit.ly/AquinasDay2021Contact Name: Alice CameronContact Email: alice.cameron@emory.eduLink: https://bit.ly/AquinasDay2021Title: Elevating Flesh: Womanist Ethics, Afro-Caribbean Carnival, and Divine EnjoymentSpeaker: Nicole SymmondsWebinar Description: There are various religious experiences if religion is defined as a cultural set of beliefs and practices that people gather around. If part of this is the gathering of persons inspired to give focused attention, adoration, and commitment to a subject or object, Trinidad Carnival and its attending practices fit into the category of religious experience. In popular Christian consciousness, Carnival exists on the fringes of what would be considered religious practice because of the festival's seeming erotic charge. Such an understanding threatens to overshadow the essence of what Carnival is, a religious, cultural experience where people of the African-Caribbean diaspora ritually participate in a practice of liberation. Carnival shares the dynamism of Black Catholic religiosity, particularly regarding its ability to enflesh freedom incarnationally, making a way out of no way for African-Caribbean people to embody their spirituality and make sense of their corporeal reality in an unjust world.This lecture explores how Trinidad Carnival serves as a practice of liberation among Black women in the 21st century who craft practices that challenge the intersecting oppressions of race, class, gender, and sexuality. These practices of liberation clarify the significance of the corporeal body of the Black woman, the unifying effect of music, the healing impact of ecstatic dance, and the connection to God that divine enjoyment of this nature enables.Speaker Biography: Nicole Symmonds is a doctoral candidate in the Graduate Division of Religion in the Ethics & Society course of study. Her work focuses on Christian social ethics and women, gender and sexuality. + Webinar Event Campus Events
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04:00PM 05:30PM Martin Luther King, Jr. Lecture 2021: University Event Topic: DiversityDepartment / Organization: African American Studies,Emory Alumni Association,Emory College,Equity and Inclusion,Goizueta Business School,School of LawEvent Open To: All (Public)Cost: FreeRegistration / R.S.V.P. link: https://www.engage.emory.edu/MLKJrLectureContact Name: Nicole IngramContact Email: odei@emory.eduMAGGIE ANDERSON, JD, MBA -In 2009, global media covered Maggie Anderson, Congressman John Lewis’ former aide, President Barack Obama’s former law student, and a successful corporate executive, as she lived out her public pledge to “buy Black” only for an entire year. Her family was threatened, and her mother was dying of pancreatic cancer. She took this stand raising two babies and with no Black owned grocery store. Maggie’s historic year AKA “The Empowerment Experiment” (“EE”) resulted in an unprecedented amount of mainstream media, university, and corporate attention specifically on Black owned businesses, systemic racism in the American economy, and economic inequality; tens of millions in revenue for and deposits into Black businesses and banks; a landmark Kellogg study proving 1 million jobs could be created if Black firms received a small increase in support; and her critically acclaimed book, “Our Black Year”. “The economic odyssey of the Anderson family is nothing short of heroic. If you care at all about making the American Dream a reality for ALL Americans, you must read this book, and apply the lessons and learnings of The Empowerment Experiment that inspired it” — Alfred Edmond Jr., Editor, Black Enterprise + Virtual Event Campus Events
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